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Bright ideas: Utility makes grants to schools with solar lesson plans

CA's PG&E's 'Solar Schools Bright Ideas' grant program awards underserved schools with hot ideas on how to use solar.
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In an effort to prepare the next generation of Californians to "think green," PG&E is awarding grants to underserved schools who have developed innovative ways to use solar technology, reports KCBS.

The program, dubbed Solar Schools Bright Ideas is awarding grants to encourage teachers to incorporate into their curricula lessons about the future of solar energy and the use of renewable energy sources today.

"PG&E's Bright Ideas initiative provides grants of $2,500 and $5,000 to underserved schools in PG&E's service area for innovative solar science projects," explained PG&E Environmental Communications Manager Keely Wachs.

"The grants can be applied to classroom, after-school and summer projects that incorporate solar power science curriculum," he told KCBS' Larry Chiaroni.

Last year, grant money was awarded to a school in Paradise, CA, to make a solar-powered oven to cook meals.

"We know that we're going to be reaching tomorrow's leaders and we want them to be not only knowledgeable about solar, but to be very comfortable with the topic because we obviously see renewables as a very important topic for our state."

Last year PG&E awarded $200,000 in Bright Ideas solar science grants to 39 schools in Northern and Central California.

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