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Feds push agency e-procurement adoption

The federal government has moved to slash procurement costs and secure greater efficiencies by launching a new guide urging its agencies to adopt e-procurement in dealing with suppliers. The Australian Government Information Management Office today released its Strategic Guide to e-Procurement, which details business cases, planning tools, procurement tools and payment methods.

The federal government has moved to slash procurement costs and secure greater efficiencies by launching a new guide urging its agencies to adopt e-procurement in dealing with suppliers.

The Australian Government Information Management Office today released its Strategic Guide to e-Procurement, which details business cases, planning tools, procurement tools and payment methods.

While many agencies already use e-procurement to book travel, buy stationery and pay suppliers by electronic funds transfer, there was room for improvement, according to Special Minister of State, Gary Nairn.

"This strategic guide is all about improving efficiency. It encourages agencies to have a look at what they are doing and how they are doing it and consider alternative systems that will result in better use of taxpayers' money," he said in a statement announcing the guide.

""The electronic alternative may not be the most appropriate for all agencies but in a lot of cases, an automated process will save time and paperwork, minimise double-handling and lower costs."

E-procurement tools could improve audit trails and activity logs, as well as speed an agency's time to market, according to the government.

Each Australian government agency is responsible for its own e-procurement. One major driving project, though is the New South Wales government's requirement for its agencies to use a common e-procurement system, Smartbuy, by mid-2007.