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Innovation

Google-based T-Mobile 'Dream' coming next month

The iPhone-killers come marching one by one, hurrah, hurrah,The Blackberry-killers come marching one by one, hurrah, hurrah,The Dreams come marching one by one,Lazaridis and Jobs stop to suck their thumbs,And they all go marching down, to the ground...(At least, that's what HTC is probably hoping.
Written by Andrew Nusca, Contributor on

Google Android in actionThe iPhone-killers come marching one by one, hurrah, hurrah, The Blackberry-killers come marching one by one, hurrah, hurrah, The Dreams come marching one by one, Lazaridis and Jobs stop to suck their thumbs, And they all go marching down, to the ground...

(At least, that's what HTC is probably hoping.)

A lovely little article in this morning's Wall Street Journal notes that T-Mobile USA plans to begin selling the first "Dream," a smartphone powered by Google's new mobile software, Android, late next month. The phone, made by HTC, is a direct competitor to Apple's iPhone and RIM's Blackberry and combines features of both devices.

According to WSJ, HTC forecasts better sales than analysts' estimates: 600,000 to 700,000 units of the smart phone this year, while analysts estimate just 300,000 to 500,000. The Dream is expected to be announced Sept. 23 and drop sometime late October (pricing still unknown).

Either way, it's looking to be a highly-anticipated device. The Journal reports:

While the phone is targeted at the same sort of technology-savvy consumers who have been buying iPhones, it has a very different look and feel. It is expected to be heavier than the iPhone, according to people familiar with it, and it is likely to have a large touch screen, a swivel-out full keyboard and a BlackBerry-style trackball to help with navigation.

Think the Dream will be Apple and RIM's nightmare? Tell us in TalkBack.

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