High school football under attack across America!

There's a disorganized but effective attack on high school football in America. In fact, it's directly hitting the football players themselves.

There's a disorganized but effective attack on high school football in America. In fact, it's directly hitting the football players themselves. As the Center for Disease Control reported earlier this week, the virulent MRSA bacterium is becoming more widespread. And it really seems to have a thing for those dirty, sweaty high school boys on the football team.

Pennsylvania may lead the league in MRSA-ed footballers. One high school there reports ten cases. A Mississippi school district is now concerned about an MRSA student death that occurred last spring. In Tennessee the health officials seem to think school locker rooms are now as dangerous as hospitals when you're speaking of MRSA. A quick perusal of Google news will show you cases now being covered by the press in Idaho, New York State, Texas, Ohio and other states. Idaho alone has fifteen deaths from MRSA so far this year. That must be half the population of Pocatello, no?

But give Idaho credit, they can provide that kind of number. Some states don't even require reporting of MRSA so they really have no idea how many cases or deaths there are. Naturally Texas is one of those states that doesn't require MRSA cases to be reported. You don't want those infernal gummit officials meddling in your god-given right to get sick. Mississippi and North Carolina don't report cases either. It keeps them from having to face stats like Tennessee's where MRSA cases doubled from 2004 to 2005.

A number of unusual tactics are being used to prevent spread of MRSA from its known headquarters in hospitals and schools. BIBLES inside surgical masks? Altogether the anti-MRSA tech is very chemical and ham-fisted, like washing down buildings in dilute bleach, using lots of soap and water, face masks, etc. Maybe we should get the ever-efficient Homeland Security Department on this. Time for some serious high-tech for detection and disinfecting. Maybe a bio-tech firm can come up with a virus that'll eat the DNA out of an MRSA bacterium. After all, the future of high school football could be at stake. Without football, what purpose could high schools possibly serve?

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