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HyperMac external battery gives juice to MacBooks for up to 32 hours

One of the most annoying things about working on your laptop anywhere outside of your home is finding a power outlet. After a few hours, your laptop dies, and you have to leave the coffee shop with your tail between your legs.
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Written by Jennifer Bergen, Contributor on

One of the most annoying things about working on your laptop anywhere outside of your home is finding a power outlet. After a few hours, your laptop dies, and you have to leave the coffee shop with your tail between your legs. Sanho just announced HyperMac: "the world's first and only external battery and car charger solution that works universally with all MacBook, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air models."

The HyperMac is available in 60Wh, 100Wh, 150Wh and 222Wh capacities for $200, $300, $400 and $500, respectively. For example, the MacBook Air's internal battery is 37Wh, but with the 222Wh HyperMac, it has six times the charge at 31.5 hours.

The HyperMac can also be used to charge your iPod or iPhone, or anything with a USB port. You can charge your laptop and your phone at the same time, or individually. The charge can be held for up to 32 hours, or you can recharge your iPhone up to 52 times.

Each HyperMac can be recharged up to 1,000 times and comes with a one-year warranty. There's also a car charger version for $150. Below is the different models and how much battery life they provide to each MacBook model.

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