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IDC: PC sales to slow down in 2001

WAP beginning to impact PC salesWireless technology and interactive TV are beginning to take their toll on PC sales, but the big slow-down is still a year away, according to the latest research from analyst firm IDC.
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Written by Jane Wakefield on

IDC predicts that 38.8 million PCs will be sold in Europe, the Middle East and Asia in 2000 -- a growth of 16.4 percent, down from 16.7 percent in 1999. However, it does not believe the small drop is the start of a slide in PC sales: Internet access is still driving consumer sales, and the free calls model being adopted by AltaVista, ntl and Freeserve will help keep PC demand high in 2000, according to IDC analyst Andy Brown. "This is not the beginning of a slide, sales will continue to be strong in 2000," he said.

But although Brown predicts another healthy 12 months, by 2001 PC technology will start to loose its appeal. He predicts PC sales will drop "in 2001 to around 15 percent".

Brown foresees that alternative technologies such as WAP phones, Bluetooth and interactive TV are already beginning to effect PC sales. "There certainly is a greater focus on wireless technology. Consumer devices and interactive TV are starting to impact the low end of the market," he said.

Guy Kewney predicts WAP rage. Go to AnchorDesk UK for the news comment.

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