iLand launches new APIs and Python, Java, and Golang software development kits

Cloud service provider aims to help developers integrate apps with iLand tech and speed development.

iLand's 'cloud console' allows users to manage functionality from a single web-based interface.

Image: Shutterstock

Cloud service provider iLand has launched a new API along with new development kits for Python, Java, and Google's Golang. The aim is to give application developers another option when managing cloud apps.

The API, along with Python, Java, and Golang software development kits (SDKs), will give DevOps, IT operations, and managed service providers, "another vector of customisability and flexibility to interface with cloud on their own terms", the company said.

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iLand is hoping that the APIs will help in its cloud infrastructure offerings, which run on its Enterprise Cloud Services-Advanced Security (ECS-AS) platform. According to the company, these integrate security, compliance, disaster recovery, backup, monitoring, and resource management with the aim of helping cloud adoption.

The ECS platform is part of iLand's open source Apache Cassandra data warehouse, which is the backend that aims to provide intelligent control, automation, and reporting capabilities.

The company also has a "cloud console" so that allows users to manage functionality from a single web-based interface, the company said. iLand's CTO Justin Giardina, the company is trying to help developers improve the transparency of what they are doing."As a user you want to be able to see what you are doing and why," he told ZDNet.

"Users want a single pane of glass. They want all of these diverse elements and, especially their VMs, all working through that single pane of glass," and to do that, a lot of products need to work through the same APIs, Giardina said.

Recently the industry has seen an attitude change towards API, he said. A few years ago, "people didn't talk about them very much but now they understand the importance and they want the right ones and the best ones".

Giardina agrees. "A few years ago nobody was talking about them, now everybody is and they want the best."

He also thinks other areas are experiencing a similar phenomenon. "Every three to five years the industry has to go through this," he said. "There will be a great idea and people talk about it and then another idea comes along and takes over. We can see this happening with DevOps. It's a great idea and now many more people and then everybody will be doing it."

iLand said initial uses for the API include DevOps and operations automation to help developers and systems engineers can rapidly spin up virtual machines or configure systems using their existing deployment tools, while operations teams can access and visually integrate cloud data alongside their other monitoring tools in a single display or network operations center.

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