Illustrating the dangers: Why the e-waste problem must be addressed

The Basel Action Network (BAN) is reporting another instance of electronics collected as part of a charity recycling event that have allegedly been redirected into trash shipments meant for developing countries.The event was hosted in the Pittsburgh area by the Humane Society and the waste handler was EarthECycle.

The Basel Action Network (BAN) is reporting another instance of electronics collected as part of a charity recycling event that have allegedly been redirected into trash shipments meant for developing countries.

The event was hosted in the Pittsburgh area by the Humane Society and the waste handler was EarthECycle. According to BAN, at least some of the items collected at the event are being sent to Hong Kong and South Africa, despite assurances by EarthECycle's owner that the recycling would all be handled locally. The organization is intervening to prevent the delivery of those shipments, and BAN reports that Hong Kong authorities have requested that the shipping company return the containers in question, which are en route back to EarthECycle. Here's more information about this development.

There is no information (at least that I can find) on the EarthECycle Web site that responds specifically to BAN's accusations. But BAN itself has provided an update statement that reportedly details some of its interaction with the owner of the company over this situation.

Moreover, here's information on two documentary films BAN that illustrate the dangers of misdirected e-waste. You might consider it propaganda, but I consider it another reminder to think twice about the company you use for your own technology recycling and refurbishment. Yes, I am a broken record. That's why I exist.