Influencing the influencers

Recently, I received an Email from a PR representative of a large supplier of software technology. Rather than presenting a new product or service, the message tried to enlist me in an effort to "try and stimulate open and honest discussions around the future of Virtualization and the current Virtualisation landscape.

Recently, I received an Email from a PR representative of a large supplier of software technology. Rather than presenting a new product or service, the message tried to enlist me in an effort to "try and stimulate open and honest discussions around the future of Virtualization and the current Virtualisation landscape."

While seeming to be an invitation to a discussion, the message didn't include an invitation to actually speak with anyone about the topic of virtualization. It was clear that this agency, and very possibly the supplier of software, was trying to influence analysts and journalists to present a viewpoint that the agency, and quite possibly the software supplier, supported. So much for a discussion.

It appears this message was the leading edge of an interesting attempt to start up a "lets you and him fight on my behalf" type of industry discussion. I think that I'll politely decline to take up their position.

I've long held the position that 1) virtualization is far more than merely the deployment of virtual machine technology and 2) organizations fare best when they develop and deploy systems based upon an overall architecture rather than an individual supplier's products. I intend to continue presenting that position.