Intel launches new chip logos, rating system

Intel has revamped its processor badging and rating system, reports CNET's Brooke Crothers, and while consumers are the main target, business systems will get new badging as well.The new badges have a "peel away" look that reveals a die graphic in the upper right hand corner, a prominent main brand (e.

Intel has revamped its processor badging and rating system, reports CNET's Brooke Crothers, and while consumers are the main target, business systems will get new badging as well.

The new badges have a "peel away" look that reveals a die graphic in the upper right hand corner, a prominent main brand (e.g., "Core"), and the modifier (e.g., "i7"). They're also wider than they are tall.

Intel has also instituted a ratings system that rates chips from five stars (best performance in class) to one star (lowest performance).

"So when a consumer goes into a Best Buy store they can distinguish between Centrino, Core, Celeron, Core 2 Duo, Core 2 Quad," said Intel spokesman Bill Calder.

While that's a great idea -- long gone are the days when the clock speed was the only metric to comparison shop with -- it may have more development to go. You tell me: would your (mother/brother/son/daughter) be able to decipher that badging when comparison shopping for a PC a la Microsoft's "Lauren" and "Giampaolo"? It remains to be seen.

"When we launched Core i7, we said we're moving to a single primary client brand, which is Core. We're moving in that direction," Calder said.

Interestingly, the netbook-favorite Atom processor will not get a modifier.

The Nehalem server processor may be slated for a branding refresh, too. Currently branded only as "Xeon" with a letter and number suffix, the chip's branding may be updated to make it more identifiable as part of the Nehalem architecture like its desktop sibling the Core i7, Calder said.