iPhone users don't use device for work, study says

The vast majority of iPhone owners, 73 percent, use their mobile devices primarily for personal reasons, according to the results of a new survey by Compete.On the other hand, 59 percent of owners of other smartphones primarily used their devices for business and work-related tasks, according to the survey.

The vast majority of iPhone owners, 73 percent, use their mobile devices primarily for personal reasons, according to the results of a new survey by Compete.

On the other hand, 59 percent of owners of other smartphones primarily used their devices for business and work-related tasks, according to the survey.

Weather forecasting apps, turn-by-turn direction apps and restaurant apps were the most popular location-aware iPhone apps, according to the survey.

Compete gave the New York Times an exclusive look, so I have no more details to offer -- but I have a hard time believing this means the iPhone isn't making inroads with the business community.

Why? First, the two figures above don't directly compare the same category: Figure 1 compares work on device A while Figure 2 compares play on device B.

More importantly, though, is the very fact that the iPhone is designed, by nature, to reach more users for more tasks. It's a media player. It's a nice phone. It's a web-browsing device. It's a GTD tool. It's a pop culture icon. It's no longer the unreachable status device, but the "default" smartphone for anyone who trades up into the segment.

Meanwhile, BlackBerrys and similar devices are still generally for the business-crowd -- save for a Pearl Flip here and there, you won't see anyone's daughter rolling with a BlackBerry Bold. And I think that's worth consideration, much less the fact that some may use a device equally for both tasks.

You tell me, readers: Do you use your iPhone for work? Do you use your BlackBerry for play?

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