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Business

Is it Color or Colour?

The tough economic period means that both public and private sector organizations are looking internally to become leaner, more efficient, and reduce costs. Amidst all the internal cuts that can be made, printing is perhaps the most overlooked, unaudited expense. This is surprising as printing activity can create a huge, unnecessary overhead - typically consuming 3% of total revenue for businesses.
Written by Doc , Contributor on

Doc always keeps his eyes open for coverage of the Managed Print Service (MPS) world and loves to bring you any articles of note. So this one from the British publication Fresh Business Thinking caught my eye, not just because it lays out a good case for MPS, but because they spell color as colour.

The tough economic period means that both public and private sector organizations are looking internally to become leaner, more efficient, and reduce costs. Amidst all the internal cuts that can be made, printing is perhaps the most overlooked, unaudited expense. This is surprising as printing activity can create a huge, unnecessary overhead - typically consuming 3% of total revenue for businesses.

Within a work environment, the need to print emails, pictures, texts, and Web pages, means that print volumes are growing, with an increased demand for colour output. Many organizations are also using high-end colour printer and copier devices to print material—previously the preserve of print houses. In addition, many organizations possess too many print devices, which are often old, inefficient, and expensive to operate.

It is therefore essential that an organization fully understand how efficient its printing activities actually are. Once this awareness is achieved, by employing a best practice' management approach to controlling printing, will dramatically reduce these potentially high costs [sic].

The author, Steve Nicholls, goes on to outline some of the problem areas in printing today, and then on to some solutions, and what the benefits are to MPS. And all in living colour.

Editorial standards