Is this the great greentech break-through?

Twenty-five years ago nobody thought computers would revolutionize human communications and commerce. Computers were speedy calculators with the ability to store data, right?

Twenty-five years ago nobody thought computers would revolutionize human communications and commerce. Computers were speedy calculators with the ability to store data, right? The phone and fax and video camera were the dominators of all communication. Right now greentech is dominated by the rush for better and cleaner energy, more efficient use of energy, with some concern for drinking water along the edges. Maybe that's NOT where the big gains lie. It may not even be in nano-tech which promises to make everything smaller and lighter and more portable. I would suggest that a genetic research breakthrough has more promise than all the current hot greentech efforts combine. Scientists now say they can replace defective, disease-linked DNA with healthy DNA. DNA swaps, think of the possibilities. Right now medical researchers are focused on dealing with hereditary diseases directly linked to DNA: e.g. type 2 diabetes, mitochondrial myopathies, and Leigh syndrome. And this work has been done in fellow primates. For all except those who deny evolution, that means this medical work is a short step from being applicable to human DNA. Current research continues at the primate lab in Beaverton, Oregon. Embryos could be screened and then efforts made to prevent the .5% of human births that have potentially pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutation. Replace the faulty DNA with healthy DNA. A healthier embryo with improved DNA. GREENTECH APPS? Everything from humans to algae have individual variances in sturdiness or tolerance of environmental or infectious conditions. Not even West Nile Virus or the Bubonic Plague kills every animal it infects. So as certain diseases become more virulent or widespread due to global warming or climate change or human population increases, wouldn't this DNA engineering be a way to further promote natural immunity, thus reduce or eliminate the natural susceptibility? Imagine an algae that can take arsenic or selenium-laced water, grow into a biodiesel source AND collect the toxic heavy-metal rather than dying from it. This would be at least as profitable as a biofuel that has a better carbon footprint than natural gas. Two important facts relating to the Oregon research. Much of it is paid for by federal grants. This lab work is not happening because some corporation is feeling generous. Like the original development of the Internet, this work happens only because many of us pay taxes. Secondly, the center uses primates and thus is under scrutiny from animal rights groups like PETA. This will be area of increasing conflict for any researcher working on animals and not algae or soybeans.