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I've just received my first "YouTube" spoofphish- it's a doozy

Well, it was inevitable. The hackers, wherever on the planet they may be, look to be spoofing YouTube to send me to a site where some very friendly young women are not hesitant to show off their physicalities.

Well, it was inevitable. The hackers, wherever on the planet they may be, look to be spoofing YouTube to send me to a site where some very friendly young women are not hesitant to show off their physicalities.

I certainly have no problem with such visages, but not when they come from spammers who manage to get past my ISP's filters.

First screen I saw came to my Comcast email box. Bearing all manner of YouTube copyright notices and purported sender info, it looked like this:

lpstick66b. Yea, right. When I clicked "clicked here" I was taken to what appeared to be a faux page where I was asked to enter my YouTube "membershpi" email and password.

I hesitated, but took this step out of loyalty to you readers, and to our mission at hand.

The next screen I got referred to the sender's knowledge that I have a "specific taste" when it comes to videos:


Playdater. OK, the investigation continues. I pasted in that URL into my browser, and tempting fate, I landed on a join-up page for a subscription-based online dating site called Friendorama. I was asked to supply info, and I presume if I had done that, my credit card info.

I just decided to back off at that point. Sometimes you just don't tempt fate.

It was then that I ran a WHOIS on playdater.net.

Registered to a Panamanian. Nothing wrong there, but it is fact that offshore sites are harder for U.S. authorities to regulate should anything be amiss. 

But still, it is interesting that they've found me.

I've never looked at a YouTube dating-oriented site, and I'm sure YouTube doesn't track this information.

Hmm, something's up?