LEDs get royal treatment, will they save the planet?

Hey, even Buckingham Palace, seat of the one of the most traditional, old-fashioned, archaic, medaeval institutions--that being British monarchy--has converted to LEDs. Can Congress and Exxon be that far behind?

Hey, even Buckingham Palace, seat of the one of the most traditional, old-fashioned, archaic, medaeval institutions--that being British monarchy--has converted to LEDs. Can Congress and Exxon be that far behind? Of course the royal family can do such things by fiat, they need not appeal to investors, lobbyists or politicians. They can just do it. Sorta like you and I.

LEDs can now be found in some pretty public places: Raleigh and Ann Arbor's street lights. And some exclusive spots like the Pentagon and Stanford University. As the mercury content of CFLs becomes more widely appreciated as a drawback, the long-lasting LEDs are becoming the new thing in lighting.

Research continues to try to get the use of precious materials out of LEDs. And the indoor market is just beginning to develop. When the local electrician put LED cannisters into our kitchen and dining room last fall, he told us it was the first time he'd installed them anywhere. LEDs are hugely efficient compared to the rampant heat creation and energy waste of the old incandescent bulbs. Thomas Edison, RIP.

How cool are LEDs? Check out this sample page of interior linghting design awards at the giant New York Lightfair that just concluded. Lots of LED products.

LEDs are currently made in many nations. Here's a list. Some of the makers are actually American companies! Though the first research and development was done by HP in the Silicon Vallery.

Here's wikipedia's good primer on LED science, tech and applications.