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Lovebug author may get 6 months jail

A similar crime in the US would get the virus author eight to twenty years in prison
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Written by Mervin Chua on

The National Bureau of Investigation is currently holding an inquest using Republic Act 8484 to try suspect Riomel Lamores. The law that facilitated the arrest of the author of the Lovebug virus may be the only legal tool available.

According to Philippine law, the Access Devices Act of 1994 (Republic Act 8484) is basically an anti-credit card fraud law. It carries a penalty of six months to six years imprisonment. By contrast, a similar crime in the US would get the virus author eight to twenty years in prison.

Extradition to the US also seems unlikely as the legal process only works if both countries have parallel laws.

Senate Bill 1902, an e-commerce law which has provisions for computer hacking is still to be passed by the Philippine Congress. However, the law doesn't work retroactively, which means that even if it were passed it won't apply to the Lovebug author.

More to follow

Would you prosecute British Gas for making it possible to put your head in the oven and turn the gas on? Chris Long is taking no prisoners with this one, he accuses users who got the ILOVEYOU virus of having the IQ equivilent to a pin mould.

Go to the TalkBack forums to say your piece and read others thoughts and brushes with the ILOVEYOU virus.

Go to ZDNet's ILOVEYOU Special Report

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