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Mac Uni nabs CIO from Objective

Macquarie University has nabbed Marc Bailey, the chief technology officer of content management software Objective, to be its new chief information officer.

Macquarie University has nabbed Marc Bailey, the chief technology officer of content management software Objective, to be its new chief information officer.

The CIO role was created after the university's existing IT director Mary Sharp left earlier this year to take up a similar role at the University of Newcastle. In a statement, Macquarie University chief operating officer Peter Dodd praised Bailey, saying the institution was "extremely fortunate" to have secured him for the role. He will commence his role on 6 October.

"IT is of critical importance to Macquarie's 32,000 students and 4000 staff, and the many user groups have quite specialised needs — from campus Wi-Fi and online lectures to resource-intensive research databases," said Dodd.

"The role has been expanded to include responsibility for overseeing records and archives," Dodd added. "This acknowledges its important role of providing information services to, and organising historical information for, the university as a whole, and ensures that the need for adequate archiving of electronic records will be addressed in information planning."

Bailey has two decades' worth of experience in the IT sector, working at all levels of government in Australia, New Zealand, Scotland and Wales, and even the European Union. He has also provided consulting services to various large organisations such as Cisco Systems, Apple, Microsoft, Telstra, optus, American Express and GlaxoSmithKline.

His appointment comes as Macquarie University has been highly active in the past few years in developing its IT infrastructure.

For example, in July Macquarie contracted Avaya to provide it with a 6000-seat IP telephony roll-out, and in late 2007 the institution took the brave step of becoming the first university in Australia to roll out Google's online email and office software platform to students.