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Michael Dell promises 'Greenprint' reference architecture

Michael Dell used his keynote at Oracle OpenWorld for product promotion and teased the audience with a "green" reference architecture. "In the next year Dell will introduce a reference architecture--the Greenprint (not to be confused with GreenPrint, a software provider that lets users manipulate documents in a print preview mode to eliminate superfluous graphics, text, or entire pages).

Michael Dell used his keynote at Oracle OpenWorld for product promotion and teased the audience with a "green" reference architecture. "In the next year Dell will introduce a reference architecture--the Greenprint (not to be confused with GreenPrint, a software provider that lets users manipulate documents in a print preview mode to eliminate superfluous graphics, text, or entire pages). Stay tuned to hear more about that soon," he said.

According to Gartner, 70 percent of businesses will have disruptions due to power constraints by 2011. "Gartner is predicting the future is brown," Dell said, echoing other CEOs, including AMD's Hector Ruiz, HP's Mark Hurd and Sun's Jonathan Schwartz, who also gave keynotes at OpenWorld.

Dell said his company would be carbon neutral by 2008 and demonstrated forthcoming blades that company CTO Kevin Kettler said would be 23 percent more power efficient than similarly configured blades from competitors.

Dell also offered his version of how more Internet users and more data (1 trillion gigabytes by 2011) will make his company happy. HP's Mark Hurd and Sun's Jonathan Schwartz offered similar views in their OpenWorld keynotes.

More users and data, more "green" infrastructure to sell and greenprint consulting services.

Dell said he would triple its services business by 2011.

Like his predecessors on the OpenWorld stage, Dell told the crowd that his company is simplifying IT. "Its the best way we can deliver value to customers. IT will be simple, virtual, more connected and most importantly, it will be greener," Dell said.

Dell re-announced that his company would become a reseller of Sun's Solaris, and touched on virtualization, which is a popular topic this week.

Kettler demonstrated dynamic workload migration using Oracle's new VM hypervisor on Dell systems, evidence of the Dell and Oracle lovefest.

He also showed of a forthcoming convertible Latitude XT, which he said was the thinnest 12.1 screen tablet, and had a screen 25 percent brighter than competing systems. It also has new multi-touch technology that senses the five fingers of a hand. He showed using all fingers to draw on the screen, like paint spattering, and managing photos on the screen. (View a video clip of the new tablet demo here.)