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MWC 2011: Xperia Play confirmed for Verizon Wireless this spring

Sony Ericsson's Xperia Play was expected to make a splash at Mobile World Congress 2011, and reports seem to be living up to the hype. Additionally, U.S. launch plans are starting to materialize.
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Written by Rachel King, Contributor on

Sony Ericsson's Xperia Play was expected to make a splash at Mobile World Congress 2011, and reports seem to be living up to the hype. Additionally, U.S. launch plans are starting to materialize.

Last week, rumors started circulating that the PlayStation-certified phone would be headed to Verizon Wireless. According to Forbes, that is true. Verizon will get the gaming smartphone in "early spring," but the door looks ajar for other carriers to follow.

Many more specs have also been revealed. Here's a running list of the best of them so far:

  • 4-inch capacitive TFT multi-touch screen (480 x 854 resolution)
  • Android 2.3 (Gingerbread)
  • 1GHz processor
  • 400MB of onboard memory
  • microSD memory card slot (8GB included; expandable up to 32GB)
  • 5.1-megapixel camera
  • Battery life: 5.5 hours of gaming time; 30.5 hours of audio playback; up to 413 hours on standby

Many gaming developers are already busy at work on titles, including Activision and its recently deceased series, Guitar Hero. Is it already making a comeback?
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