My pick for the Yahoo CEO job . . .

If I were Yahoo I would try to recruit Sean Maloney, Intel's executive vice president and Chief of Sales and Marketing.Mr Maloney has had a lot of experience turning around troubled Intel business groups and he is easily one of the most competent executives in the tech industry.

If I were Yahoo I would try to recruit Sean Maloney, Intel's executive vice president and Chief of Sales and Marketing. Mr Maloney has had a lot of experience turning around troubled Intel business groups and he is easily one of the most competent executives in the tech industry. He was once in the running for the top job at Hewlett-Packard. Although Mr Maloney is fiercely loyal to Intel he might be persuaded to jump ship by the scope of the challenge. Turning around Yahoo is easily the most challenging job in the tech industry bar none. It's partly the reason Microsoft doesn't want Yahoo anymore. And there is not much to do at Intel these days, it won the microprocessor wars. Paul Otellini, President and CEO of Intel, has about seven years before retirement - that's a long time to wait when you are at the top of your game. Mr Maloney would create a tremendous amount of value in revamping Yahoo. It's a company with great technologies and people but it is rudderless. It needs someone like Mr Maloney to get it moving again. - - - Please see Businessweek:

CEO Search: Can Anyone Save Yahoo?

What Yahoo needs, say management recruiters and analysts, is someone with the profile of Hewlett-Packard (HPQ) CEO Mark V. Hurd. A low-key operating wizard from the relative tech backwater of NCR (NCR), Hurd has managed to turn around HP in the three short years since he joined. In fact, one source close to the search says Yahoo isn't ruling out an executive outside the Internet realm. "You need someone who doesn't have the ego of a rock star," says Dona Roche-Tarry, a partner at executive search firm CTPartners. "But the new person would need the strength of character to stand up to Yang and the board."