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Innovation

MySpace launches movie "mashup"

In partnership with Vertigo Films and Film4, MySpace has launched "MyMovie Mashup", a UK only competition to find the director for a new 1.96 million dollar-funded British movie.
Written by Steve O'Hear, Contributor on
MySpace to Facebook: anything you can do, we can do better. With Facebook announcing plans to create a User-Generated television series called "Facebook Diaries", MySpace UK is being far more ambitious. In partnership with Vertigo Films and Film4, MySpace has launched "MyMovie Mashup", a UK only competition to find the director for a new 1.96 million dollar-funded British movie.

According to the official MyMovie Mashup page:

Entries will be judged by a distinguished panel of filmmakers and actors who will select five finalists. The finalists then face a public vote by millions of MySpace users to decide the ultimate winner. The lucky winning director will immediately begin production on their feature film…

But the fun doesn't stop there. The MySpace community will also participate in the development process by being able to comment on the script, as well as putting themselves forward for various acting roles or helping audition others.

Whether or not MyMovie Mashup produces a great end product, I think the process itself will be a huge success. It has lots of proven elements -- a short film competition (ala YouTube), viewer participation in the best 'Idol' tradition, and a journey-based narrative for the MySpacers to follow: pre-production to premiere, with plenty of drama along the way.

Related post: Facebook, the TV show; but will advertisers bite?

 

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