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Nokia CTO envisions mobile tech in 2010

The closing keynote at Nokia World today was delivered by Tero Ojanperä, Nokia's Chief Technology Officer. He used the session to make some predictions, based on trends we're seeing today, about what the world will look like from a technology and mobility perspective in the year 2010. Many speakers throughout the day referenced consistent and familiar themes like the increasing availability of broadband connectivity, the growth in adoption of smarter, converged devices, and the increasing expectation of consumers for rich services delivery to the handset. What Ojanperä did most effectively was describe what such a world might look like.

The closing keynote at Nokia World today was delivered by Tero Ojanperä, Nokia's Chief Technology Officer. He used the session to make some predictions, based on trends we're seeing today, about what the world will look like from a technology and mobility perspective in the year 2010. Many speakers throughout the day referenced consistent and familiar themes like the increasing availability of broadband connectivity, the growth in adoption of smarter, converged devices, and the increasing expectation of consumers for rich services delivery to the handset.

What Ojanperä did most effectively was describe what such a world might look like. And he did it using a number of devices. He spoke, at the beginning of his talk, about what it would be like to wake up in Amsterdam in 2010 preparing to attend that year's Nokia World event and how the smarter, more powerful mobile device we would be using a few years from now would enhance the ability to start the day, get to the event, document what took place, and even place a drink order at the party that followed the opening day's events.

It was compelling, if not exactly revolutionary stuff. OK, some of the examples were downright silly - like the notion that you'd need your sneakers to talk to your phone to let you know that it was raining. But, occasional stretches aside, he built on that story by making a fairly extraordinary set of predictions about what the converged device many of us will be using four years from now will offer:

  • 100+ hours of music
  • 3D ciinema surround
  • 10 megapixel still photo resolution
  • 7X optical zoom
  • HDTV reception
  • VGA display
  • 3D console graphics
  • Projection capabilities
  • 20-100 GB storage
He backed this vision up by citing the fact that next year sales of converged mobile devices will, for the first time, exceed those of laptop computers. And, by 2010, he reported, more of these devices will be sold than all PC form factors combined.

As was the case in many of the presentations today, he reinforced the messages he had delivered by playing a video that combined powerful visual images, pointed sound bites, and some very upbeat music. The key message of the video segment was that a single user interface does not always provide the best way to interact with the rich set of services we can increasingly access using a mobile device and that the devices we can expect to see emerge over the next few years will allow us to interact with services and information using touch, voice, and gestures. A number of the sessions I attended provided a lot of information. So did the conversations I had with Nokia folks throughout the day. What Ojanperä did very nicely was pull many of the facts and statistics Nokia is obviously keen to impart to attendees together into a coherent and well-delivered summation.
Highlights on tap for tomorrow include presentations by:
  • Alan Moore, founding director of SMLXL (Small, Medium, Large, Extra Large) and co-author of Communities Dominate Brands on the convergence of Web 2.0 and mobile
  • Anssi Vanjoki, Executive Vice President and GM of Nokia's Multimedia division discussing the evolution of the internet with an emphasis on on the impact of social media
  • Geoffrey Moore, author of Crossing the Chasm on innovation
  • Alastair Curtis, Nokia's Chief Designer detailing design visions for Nokia's future