Oracle acquires StackEngine, plots new cloud campus in Austin

A few days ago, it was quietly confirmed that Oracle acquired StackEngine, a startup with a container operations platform for DevOps based in Austin, Texas.

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Oracle has announced a few moves in the last week that line up to bolster the tech giant's cloud agenda next year.

A few days ago, it was quietly confirmed that Oracle acquired StackEngine, a startup with a container operations platform for DevOps based in Austin, Texas.

Both Oracle and StackEngine affirmed the merger on their respective websites and that all StackEngine employees will be joining Oracle's public cloud team.

Beyond that, no details -- including financial terms -- of the deal have been revealed.

On Tuesday, the Silicon Valley titan unveiled plans to construct a new campus in Austin dedicated to expanding Oracle's cloud portfolio.

Scott Armour, vice president of Oracle's cloud sales organization, Oracle Direct, explained in the announcement that Austin was chosen because the database maker already has "a high-performing employee base in the region, and the surrounding technology community is teeming with creative and innovative thinkers."

The first phase is scheduled to produce a 560,000-square-foot complex and parking development. Touting to support the local workforce as well, the plans also include an adjacent 295-unit apartment building allotted for employee housing and purchase.

The Redwood City, Calif.-based corporation promises to expand the Austin team by more than 50 percent over the next few years with a focus on hiring recent university graduates and early-stage technical professionals.

"Our state-of-the-art campus will be designed to inspire, support and attract top talent - with a special focus on the needs of millennials," Armour wrote.

Oracle has been steadily expanding its geographical and educational footprints over 2015. In October, the company published plans to build a public charter high school on its campus in Redwood City, Calif., scheduled to be completed and ready for sessions in fall 2017.

Named Design Tech High School (d.tech), the new 64,000-square-foot facility will be used by 550 students and 30 faculty. Oracle employees are also being tapped to volunteer and teach specific tracks during interim sessions between semesters.