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SAS Brazil launches program to train unemployed techies

The initiative will enhance the skill set of professionals with the company's business intelligence and analytics tools

Data analytics giant SAS has launched a training program to help Brazilian technology professionals find a new job as the country economic climate worsens.

Some 20 places in eight different courses will be offered from now until December 2016, which include SAS programming, data mining, statistics, business intelligence and visual analytics.

To be able to take part in the program, prospective candidates will have to either hold a degree in relevant areas or have practical experience in SAS tools.

The courses will have the duration of two to five days and will be held in São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and the capital Brasília.

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"Those who are skilled in the SAS tools and data analytics will certainly have a competitive advantage in job interviews as the will be able to present sought-after qualifications for the areas of analytics and business intelligence," says training coordinator at SAS Brazil, Andreia Santos.

The company is also recruiting for a number of positions based at its three Brazilian offices, mostly related to sales and consulting of data analytics products.

SAS is considered one of the best tech workplaces in Brazil. As well as investing in career and skills development plans - it uses a specific leadership framework for improving management abilities - the company is said to have served as an inspiration to Google in terms of staff perks.

The current recession in Brazil is forcing organizations to reduce their IT departments as well as overall technology costs, recent research suggests.

Some 35 percent of organizations in the country will be reducing their IT departments, while 10 percent will be replacing more senior staff for employees on lower salaries, according to the yearly report on local trends published last month by Brazilian research firm IT4CIO.