Scientists invent candy-colored solar panels that don't need direct sunlight to work

Scientists have developed candy-colored solar panels that capture different parts of the sun's light spectrum and don't need direct sunlight to work.

Scientists have developed candy-colored solar panels that capture different parts of the sun's light spectrum and don't need direct sunlight to work.

The jewel tones of the panels allow them to capture different parts of the sun's light spectrum, according to Jerusalem-based GreenSun, the company behind the technology.

Conventional solar panels require direct sunlight to produce electricity. In contrast, the colored panels don't need to face the sun and can absorb dispersed light, allowing for energy collection on a cloudy day, albeit with less efficiency.

The company says the colored panels are less expensive than conventional solar panels because they require less silicon to manufacture.

So how do they work? When light hits one of the colored panels, it is diffused to the edges, which are covered with silicon solar receptors that, in turn, produce electricity.

The company says the colored panels are more practical because they can replace everyday building surfaces, such as windows and walls, rather than requiring a full roof or field panel array to be effective.

Solar energy remains expensive for the average consumer. The tipping point is creating solar technology that at least achieves parity with the cost of fossil fuels.

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This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com