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The Morning Briefing: New medical studies

"The Morning Briefing" is SmartPlanet's daily roundup of must-reads from the web. This morning we're reading about recent studies linked to human health.
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Written by Charlie Osborne, Contributor on

"The Morning Briefing" is SmartPlanet's daily roundup of must-reads from the web. This morning we're reading about recent studies linked to human health.

1.) Sedentary life amplifies obesity genes? A new U.S. study concludes that a sedentary lifestyle can amplify a genetic disposition to obesity -- however, just by walking 'briskly' and exercising a little more, the effect can be cut by 50 percent.

2.) Womb environment influences childhood obesity? Researchers from Newcastle University, UK, have linked the environment in the womb with increased body weight in later life. The scientists found that changes in DNA may result from a mother's diet or stress levels, and these in turn may cause a higher Body Mass Index (BMI) in children from the age of nine.

3.) Metal-on-Metal hip implants should be banned? A UK study conducted by the Lancet has implied that metal-on-metal hip implants are more likely to fail than devices made from other materials -- and therefore should be banned. The world's largest database on hip replacements was analysed, viewing both materials and rates of failure or success.

4.) Sugary drink each day ups male heart disease risk by 20 percent. Sorry, guys. If you enjoy your can of carbonated, sugary drink a day -- your soda -- you may be putting your heart at risk. Harvard researchers looked at approximately 43,000 men between 40 and 75, studying their dietary habits and conducting blood work to ascertain health risks.

5.) New data fuels debate over prostate cancer screening. A long-term study has been refreshed with new data, and has concluded that regular prostate cancer screening cuts the risk of death from prostate cancer. However, there was no significant difference between those who were screened and those who were not -- and it would take 1,055 men to be screened and 37 to be diagnosed in order to prevent one fatality.

Image credit: Sandra Cohen-Rose, Colin Rose

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

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