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Innovation

Those scoundrels, Part 2. Brit IT managers aren't feeling the heat when it comes to reducing power consumption

Those bloody good fellows at 1E, which sells a power management utility for Windows called NightWatchman, revealed some data this week that suggests a troubling number of IT managers in its native country aren't yet tuned into the virtues of curtailing the electricity usage of the computer fleets under their watchAccording to the mini-survey, one-third of respondents feel "zero pressure" to reduce power consumption.
Written by Heather Clancy, Contributor

Those bloody good fellows at 1E, which sells a power management utility for Windows called NightWatchman, revealed some data this week that suggests a troubling number of IT managers in its native country aren't yet tuned into the virtues of curtailing the electricity usage of the computer fleets under their watch

According to the mini-survey, one-third of respondents feel "zero pressure" to reduce power consumption. This despite the fact that almost 90 percent of the managers were aware of their employer's broad environmental policy. But, apparently, the survey goes on to report that less than one-quarter of the IT managers polled actually has control over power usage. Hence, the major reason for the disconnect.

The survey seems a bit contrived, although the company's other information resources are pretty compelling. And, the 1E survey out of Britain really underscores the necessity for technology teams and facilities management groups to put their heads and teams together to address the green technology problem. It's another instance of the responsibilities associated with two corporate job functions converging without any real convergence of accountability or shared best practices. Only when it comes to green tech being applied to meaningful conservation, no one has the time to sort through traditional corporate politics to make sure everyone plays nice. Let's get on with it.

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