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Unix competitors join over OSDN

LinuxWorld this week saw the convening of bitter Unix competitors, such as Sun Microsystems, IBM, Hewlett-Packard and Compaq Computer around a common user interface, Gnome or Gnu Network Object Modeling Environment. Now the same vendors are united in supporting the Open Source Development Network.

LinuxWorld this week saw the convening of bitter Unix competitors, such as Sun Microsystems, IBM, Hewlett-Packard and Compaq Computer around a common user interface, Gnome or Gnu Network Object Modeling Environment. Now the same vendors are united in supporting the Open Source Development Network.

OSDN is a new division of VA Linux Systems, which has founded the OSDN Technology Partner Program for open source developers. The group is gearing up to provide development equipment, storage, training and funding for open source developers. It includes IBM, Hewlett-Packard and EMC, which are locked in a battle to supply large system storage, along with Sun, which is showing a growing strength in the field. It also includes Intel, whose Pentium processors compete directly with Sun's Sparc processors.

OSDN has launched a new Web site as a gateway for collaborative open source development and community outreach. The site is expected to benefit 50,000 registered users of VA Linux Systems' SourceForge, an open source code project hosting site, and the 60,000 registered users of Freshmeat.net, a site providing shareware and open source code downloads. Freshmeat.net was acquired by VA Linux Systems as part of the former Andover.net, which was a popular open source code developer site hosting the Slashdot.org forum, as well as source code giveaways.

Bruce Twickler, president of OSDN, said the new members of its Technology Partner Program showed "an extensive roster of industry leaders support for the open source development model." The OSDN partner program is aimed at making development resources, including project management capabilities, more broadly available and speed the development of Linux and other open source software, said Victor Krutul, manager of OS Programs at Intel.

Sun Microsystems "is eager to make it easier for developers to support open source applications on Solaris," said Danese Cooper, manager at the new Sun Open Source Programs Office.