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European Parliament to revisit telecom regulations

The Members of the European Parliament (MEP) are to convene once more to discuss Internet access and the rules that are currently being tabled and will be the sole topic up for discussion.
Written by Doug Hanchard, Contributor on

The Members of the European Parliament (MEP) are to convene once more on November 4 to discuss Internet access, along with new rules that are currently being tabled and will be the sole topic up for discussion. At the last meeting on October 6, the Council of EU Telecommunications Ministers formally rejected Parliament's second-reading amendment on internet access, which dealt with access freedom, indirectly pointed to file sharing and creating a law on disconnecting users that do so illegally.

In a press release by the European Parliament, the Council for EU telecommunications will be discussing a variety of legal issues that have caused a stir around the world on restricting internet access.

Alejo VIDAL-QUADRAS (EPP, Spain) who heads Parliament's Conciliation Committee delegation, said after the last of these meetings on Thursday morning: "We go into the negotiations in a spirit of compromise, but determined to defend users' rights and committed to the development of a regulatory framework that will incentivise investment and open up the market. We will do all we can to achieve a good solution, but Council has to understand that Parliament will defend without hesitation the freedom of the citizens it represents".

The group is reviewing a complete package of innovation, safety and other reforms in respects to telecommunications, including traditional television and radio broadcast, security, privacy,  email spam, cyberterrorism,  phone number portability and those with disabilities accessing technology. Currently the council is at a significant cross roads on the Internet access and file sharing, copyright and this single issue could scrap the entire telecom package being tabled and given final reading for passage.

Looming larger is how European Parliament's new regulations and Laws would affect sovereignty of each nation's jurisdiction with respect to enforcement. One such example: if an individual is convicted of an infraction in Spain, would that country's court decision (if based on this new set of Laws) be then applicable to all other nations inside the EU with respect to the individual's conviction? If it is enforceable and agreed upon by all signing nations, this may indicate that Europe is beginning to eliminate the issue of sovereignty all together.

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