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Introducing the world's smallest 802.11n adapter

I'm not sure there was a groundswell of opinion asking networking manufacturers for tinier USB-based network adapter, but smaller is always better, right? At least that's the thinking from Planex, which claims to have built the world's smallest, lightest 802.
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Written by Sean Portnoy, Contributor on

I'm not sure there was a groundswell of opinion asking networking manufacturers for tinier USB-based network adapter, but smaller is always better, right? At least that's the thinking from Planex, which claims to have built the world's smallest, lightest 802.11n adapter in the form of the GW-USMini2N. (See a comparison shot between it and a conventional D-Link adapter here.)

Besides being just 55.5 millimeters in length, the GW-USMini2N offers a "Software AP" feature that Planex says makes it easy for Nintendo DSs and Wiis, Sony PSPs, and iPod Touches/iPhones to connect to Wi-Fi networks. I'm not quite sure what makes the GW-USMini2N's approach any easier than my current home network's to let me access the network with my iPhone, but Planex apparently thinks it's a pretty big deal. The GW-USMini2N is also compatible with Mac OS X, including support for XLink Kai's online gaming community. It supports up-to-date security like WPA and WPA-2 encryption, though WPA isn't what it's cracked up to be these days. (Pun intended.)

The biggest problem you might have with the GW-USMini2N is finding it. It's not available through Best Buy or other major retailers yet, though you can buy it on Amazon.com here.

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