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Hong Kong from a techie's eyes: photos

On a lightning trip to Hong Kong, ZDNet Australia took a moment to travel the city camera in hand and document a sample of the technology the city has to offer.
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By Darren Pauli on
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1 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

Technology is big here, really big. You could, on face value, sum up the city's shops in three words: Gadgets, Gucci and Gourmet.

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2 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

Techies spruik HTC Android phones in Hong Kong's Causeway Bay station. Outside, hawkers flog somewhat spurious Apple products, such as iPhones and iPads. They were disinclined to permit a product test.

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3 of 15 Octopus and Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

"It's our best tech export" is how one local IT professional described Hong Kong's Octopus travel card, which comes in flavours sure to please professionals, pragmatics, and girls and boys. The watches pictured above come with an embedded Octopus RFID chip.

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4 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

The Octopus card takes milliseconds to read, meaning commuters can walk straight through the subway gates. Those without an Octopus card can purchase a ticket. We saw a rather elderly man swing his RFID wrist watch over the scanner and hop through the gates like it's nobody's business — which it was: he didn't want to talk.

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5 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

The Octopus terminals (this is a close up of the card) are scattered throughout Hong Kong's transport system and are also used in businesses as an attendance system. They can also be used to purchase a myriad of goods and services.

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6 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

Hong Kong's humble train maps are digitised and use touchscreens. Prod your station, pay and ride. Similar panels on-board trains illuminate approaching stations and inform passengers when they can change to an intersecting line.

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7 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

Victoria Park offers city-dwellers an oasis of respite, exercise and free wireless internet.

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8 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

Wi-Fi access points are tastefully nestled around the park, creating a would-be treasure hunt for those seeking them out.

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9 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

There may be a download limit nestled in the long terms of use, but despite trying it didn't seem possible to go over it — at least in a short time.

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10 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

This access point was located in the beautiful Kowloon Park, several kilometres away across the Victoria River.

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11 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

The Hong Kong Government offers a secure Wi-Fi connection with 802.11x. Visitors should use the secure option.

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12 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

The road to the Hong Kong University of Technology is lined with gardens and ends here, with flags of China and Hong Kong.

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13 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

A sundial is the centrepiece of the university's entrance, a symbol of the university's strength in geometry and design.

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14 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

ZDNet Australia met with Professor Pedro Sander who has snapped the world's highest resolution photograph at a mind-boggling 150 billion pixels. It was taken from the Statue of Christ in Rio de Janeiro's Sugar Loaf Mountain and overlooks his home, somewhere on the right. The resolution is so high, he can nearly check to see if anyone is home. See our coverage here.

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15 of 15 Darren Pauli/ZDNet Australia

Sander's photo was taken with this, a Canon EOS 550D, for sale on eBay for $1200. However, it's the lens that is important. It's a 400-millimetre lens with a 2x extender, creating an effective 800 millimetres. The robotic arm it lies on allowed it to take the 6000 photos required for the large photo to be created with Sander's custom open-source software.

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