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Photos: Amphibious 'Quadski' hits the waves

U.K.'s Gibbs Technologies unveils commercially viable high-speed amphibian quadbike/all terrain vehicle.

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1 of 6 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Quadski on water

Gibbs Technologies, a high-speed amphibian (HSA) technology specialist, has unveiled a prototype of what it says will be the first commercially viable high-speed amphibian quadbike/all terrain vehicle (ATV), the Quadski.

The Quadski represents the third demonstration of Gibbs' HSA technology, following in the tire tracks of its Aquada and Humdinga vehicles. The Quadski is capable of travelling up to 50 mph on land and water and makes the transition, according to the company, at the flick of a switch.

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2 of 6 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Quadski on land

"I know consumers will love the fun of driving a Quadski on land one minute and then head straight into the sea or river the next," said Alan Gibbs, founder of U.K.-based Gibbs Technologies. "But there is a very serious side to Quadski as well: Emergency services and aid workers will be able to reach areas and people no two- or four-wheel drive vehicle could reach."

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3 of 6 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Quadski in the air

Gibbs Technologies says it has patented more than 60 inventions relating to HSA technology and has technical expertise in areas including hydrodynamics, retracting suspension, water jet technology, cooling, air-water separation and hull design.

Here, the Quadski takes flight.

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4 of 6 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Aquada crosses channel

The Quadski utilizes the same high-speed technology found in the Aquada, an amphibian "leisure vehicle" launched by Gibbs in 2003. Simply press a button and drive into the water. The wheels automatically rise, and as you press the accelerator, nearly a ton of thrust pushes the Aquada onto the water surface. The whole process takes less than 12 seconds, the company says.

The Aquada set the world water speed record for crossing the English Channel.

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5 of 6 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Aquada and waterskiier

The Aquada enters the water via beach, boat ramp, slipway or directly from the water's edge. It is strong enough to tow a waterskiier.

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6 of 6 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Humdinga

The Humdinga by Gibbs was designed to access remote and hostile terrain. The company says the vehicle can comfortably transport five people complete with luggage and supplies.

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