/>
X

Photos: Stonehenge's day in the sun

On the summer solstice, the ancient stone structure in England is the place to be. And to imitate.
By Bill Detwiler, Contributor on
12386.jpg
1 of 8 Bill Detwiler/ZDNET

Summer solstice

A man stands on top of Stonehenge as the sun rises on June 21, 2006, in Amesbury, England. An estimated 19,000 people celebrated the start of the longest day of the year at the 5,000-year-old stone circle. Reportedly, only four arrests were made at the all-night party.

12387.jpg
2 of 8 Bill Detwiler/ZDNET

Stonehenge

Construction around the Neolithic and Bronze Age monument has been dated as far back as 3100 BC--with the stones being erected between 2500 and 2000 BC. There are many stories about who built the monument. One of the most popular theories says that it was built by Druids, Celtic priests who supposedly used it for sacrificial ceremonies. How the mammoth stones were moved by a society with Stone Age technology has confounded experts and led many to believe in extraterrestrial assistance.

12388.jpg
3 of 8 Bill Detwiler/ZDNET

Sunset 2005

The summer solstice at Stonehenge became a pilgrimage for present-day druids and other modern visitors in the 1870s. In 1905, the Ancient Order of Druids first recreated Druidic practices to celebrate the longest day of the year. The celebrations grew until 1985, when 30,000 pilgrims attended a celebration that ended in a violent confrontation with police. This resulted in a ban on summer solstice visitors that lasted until 2000.

12389.jpg
4 of 8 Bill Detwiler/ZDNET

Google Earth

Could the builders ever have imagined seeing their site from Google Earth? (Well, possibly, if aliens really did pitch in.)

12390.jpg
5 of 8 Bill Detwiler/ZDNET

Carhenge

Stonehenge has been replicated numerous times. Here is one of the more famous ones--Carhenge in Alliance, Neb.--where junk cars replace the mammoth stones.

And here are some instructions to help you build your own Stonehenge.

12391.jpg
6 of 8 Bill Detwiler/ZDNET

Stonehenge watch

This watch might be the perfect gift for the person who wants to unravel the mysteries of time. Many experts believe that Stonehenge was constructed as a kind of time piece to determine seasonal or celestial events.

The Stonehenge watch can be purchased from Sharpe Products for $42.95.

12392.jpg
7 of 8 Bill Detwiler/ZDNET

Stonefridge

Stonefridge is a Stonehenge replica built from refrigerators in Sante Fe, N.M.

12393.jpg
8 of 8 Bill Detwiler/ZDNET

Foamhenge

Next stop is Natural Bridge, Va., where Foamhenge was erected in a day. It's made out of Styrofoam.

Related Galleries

Holiday wallpaper for your phone: Christmas, Hanukkah, New Year's, and winter scenes
Holiday lights in Central Park background

Related Galleries

Holiday wallpaper for your phone: Christmas, Hanukkah, New Year's, and winter scenes

21 Photos
Winter backgrounds for your next virtual meeting
Wooden lodge in pine forest with heavy snow reflection on Lake O'hara at Yoho national park

Related Galleries

Winter backgrounds for your next virtual meeting

21 Photos
Holiday backgrounds for Zoom: Christmas cheer, New Year's Eve, Hanukkah and winter scenes
3D Rendering Christmas interior

Related Galleries

Holiday backgrounds for Zoom: Christmas cheer, New Year's Eve, Hanukkah and winter scenes

21 Photos
Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6: Electric vehicle extravaganza
img-8825

Related Galleries

Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6: Electric vehicle extravaganza

26 Photos
A weekend with Google's Chrome OS Flex
img-9792-2

Related Galleries

A weekend with Google's Chrome OS Flex

22 Photos
Cybersecurity flaws, customer experiences, smartphone losses, and more: ZDNet's research roundup
shutterstock-1024665187.jpg

Related Galleries

Cybersecurity flaws, customer experiences, smartphone losses, and more: ZDNet's research roundup

8 Photos
Inside a fake $20 '16TB external M.2 SSD'
Full of promises!

Related Galleries

Inside a fake $20 '16TB external M.2 SSD'

8 Photos