/>
X
Business

Citrix appoints second new CEO in under two years

The company wants to move to cloud subscriptions and develop data-security and analytics services.
Written by Steve Ranger, Global News Director on
citrix-building.jpg

Citrix says it intends to increase investment to speed up its shift to cloud-based subscriptions.

Image: Citrix

Citrix Systems has promoted its CFO and COO David Henshall to president and CEO of the company, replacing Kirill Tatarinov.

The company said Henshall's appointment follows "the mutual separation decision" between the Citrix board and Tatarinov, who was president, CEO, and director of Citrix. As part of the changes, Mark Coyle, senior vice president, has also been appointed interim CFO.

The company said it intends to increase investment to speed up Citrix's shift to a cloud-based subscription business model and to move into new areas, such as data security and analytics services.

Citrix is probably best known for its server and desktop and application virtualization products XenApp, XenDesktop, and XenServer, but also offers XenMobile mobile-device management tools, as well as enterprise file sync and sharing, and networking. Its 2016, the company's annual revenue stood at $3.42bn and its software is used by more than 400,000 organizations.

Tatarinov, previously an executive at Microsoft, had been appointed president and CEO of Citrix in January last year. In March this year, Bloomberg reported that the company was working with advisers to seek companies interested in making a bid for it.

Citrix said revenue for its second financial quarter ended June is expected to be in line with the company's current guidance of $685m to $695m "with strong demand from customers for subscription-based solutions".

More on Citrix

Editorial standards

Related

How much RAM does your Windows 11 PC need?
adobestock-339222220

How much RAM does your Windows 11 PC need?

What is ChatGPT and why does it matter? Here's what you need to know
chat bot

What is ChatGPT and why does it matter? Here's what you need to know

Low-code is not a cure for overworked IT departments just yet
a-woman-looking-stressed-out-in-front-of-a-laptop-in-an-office-meeting-room

Low-code is not a cure for overworked IT departments just yet