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Dell Streak: Will it sell?

Dell has delivered some key pricing details about its Android-powered Streak device, which appears to be a tweener between a smartphone and a tablet. You buying?
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Written by Larry Dignan, Contributor on

Dell has delivered some key pricing details about its Android-powered Streak device, which appears to be a tweener between a smartphone and a tablet.

According to Dell:

  • The Streak will run you $299.99 with a 2-year AT&T contract and $549.99 without.
  • People that registered for a pre-sale can get the Streak on Thursday.
  • The general public gets the Streak on Friday.
  • The device ships with Android 1.6 and will get an over-the-air upgrade to Android 2.2 later this year.

The big question: You buying?

[poll id="139"]

I have my concerns about a 5-inch tablet. After all, you could get a Droid X with a 4.3-inch screen and the latest Android for $199.99 after rebates on Verizon. If you want a semi-big screen Android device the Droid X could trump the Streak. TechRepublic's Bill Detwiler pegged the problem early on: The Streak is too much like a smartphone and not enough like a tablet. Adrian Kingsley-Hughes adds that the Streak is a device without a defined audience.

The Streak...

the Droid X...

Meanwhile, John Gruber notes that a new iPod touch is on deck. Dell's Streak will compete with the tablet and smartphone categories because of its screen size.

There may be some initial demand for the Streak, but the real tell will be the sales after a few weeks and months. I have a hard time seeing the Streak hold sales momentum.

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