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How to watch the Apple iPhone event live stream today

The iPhone and iPad maker is widely expected to announce new hardware.
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Written by Zack Whittaker, Writer-editor on

Apple is holding a mid-season event to reveal what is widely expected to be new products.

The event is expected on March 21 at Apple's headquarters in Cupertino, California at 10am PT and 1pm ET. (You can see that in your local timezone here).

The company is expected to announce a 4-inch iPhone, likely called the iPhone SE, which lands with a new A9 processor, Touch ID, Apple Pay support, and an 8-megapixel rear-camera. A new 9.7-inch iPad is also expected, along with some incremental updates to Apple Watch.

7 small-screen smartphones: Can 4-inch iPhone SE trump rivals?

Apple will stream the event live, featuring Apple chief executive Tim Cook and other senior executives.

If you are around to watch the hour-long keynote, viewers must watch the stream online with with Safari on iOS 7.0 or later, a Mac with Safari 6.0.5 or later on OS X 10.8.5 or later.

If you're watching through Apple TV, you can watch the stream on second or third-generation Apple TV with software 6.2 or later, or on any fourth-generation Apple TV.

Windows 10 users can also watch live through the Edge browser.

If you're away from your television, we'll have live coverage throughout the day..

You can check the @ZDNet Twitter stream for news as it happens, or check out our Apple section. You can also read our sister site CNET's live blog for up-to-date coverage.

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