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Innovation

Intel's netbook app store: One too many?

commentary As chip giant launches AppUp, Larry Dignan weighs whether app store fatigue is setting in.
Written by Larry Dignan, Contributor on

commentary Intel has rolled out a beta of a store dubbed AppUp to aggregate software for netbooks and Asus, Acer, Dell and Samsung plan to integrate their hardware with the marketplace. The big question: Do we need one?

Think about it. The netbook is designed for the Internet. Aren't applications supposed to ride shotgun with your browser? How about rich Internet applications? Intel said at this year's Consumer Electronics Show:

"The Intel AppUp center offers netbook users quick and easy access to applications specifically tailored to their mobile lifestyle. Our store does the work of aggregating, categorizing and validating applications so consumers can shop, collect and install from one easy source. With [the] kickoff of our beta store, both developers and consumers will be able to take advantage of the rapid expansion of this new category of computing as the stores continually add apps."

The problem: I'm already suffering app store fatigue. Intel's AppUp will host applications for Windows and its open source Moblin operating system. Ultimately, AppUp will be available to smartphones, consumer electronics and devices run by Intel processors.

My take on AppUp: first, the selection's a bit thin, but that's to be expected. There will be more applications because the netbook market is huge.

Read more of "Intel launches netbook app store; One store too many?" at ZDNet.com.

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