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Lenovo slashes monitor energy consumption by up to 60 percent

What with all the financial market doom and gloom this week, I clear forgot there were at least two fairly sizable trade shows going on in computer-dom. China's Lenovo used one of them to introduce a series of six ThinkVision monitors that boast various green tech credentials.

What with all the financial market doom and gloom this week, I clear forgot there were at least two fairly sizable trade shows going on in computer-dom. China's Lenovo used one of them to introduce a series of six ThinkVision monitors that boast various green tech credentials.

For one thing, these displays supposedly use 30 percent to 60 percent less energy than their older siblings in the ThinkVision line. Plus, they are all Gold-rated under the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (aka EPEAT) and are also GreenGuard-certified, which means they have been tested for more than 2,000 different chemical emissions.

The model numbers for the new series are the ever-intuitive: ThinkVision L1700p, L1940 Wide, L1940 Wide, L2240p Wide, L2440p Wide and L2440x Wide. Hey, did you guess that most of them are wide screen? They are configured with contrast ratios of 1000:1, boast five-millisecond response times and use 1920x1200 resolution.

The one that Lenovo is making the most hoopla about is the L2440x Wide, which is a 24-inch display that uses just 29 watts of power while being low in halogen content. It also ditches the mercury and arsenic. The one thing that isn't conservative is its price: $749.99.

Most of the new monitors are supposed to ship next month with the exception of the ThinkVision L1700p, which is supposed to be available tomorrow starting at $239.99.