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Low-income school breaks out with aerospace

Farnsworth Magnet School on the city's minority East Side created an unusual program which inspires students to develop early mathematic and engineering skills by using concepts and activities from aerospace program.
Written by ZDNET Editors, Contributor on
Struggling low-income schools often find it hard to find implement programs that go above and beyond the basics, but one school in St. Paul, MN has found an innovative approach to inspiring its elementary school student's—aerospace. An article from the Aero-News Network reports that Farnsworth Magnet School on the city's minority East Side created an unusual program which inspires students to develop early mathematic and engineering skills by using concepts and activities from aerospace program.
Troy Vincent, principal of the Farnsworth Magnet School, told the Twin Cities Pioneer Press recently, "This is like college. Once the kids realize they have a unique opportunity at his school -- but have to work hard to earn it -- the kids "start to behave it."

The results are clear. Farnsworth students consistently score higher on state tests than their peers at three other area schools with predominantly lower-income student populations.

For example, Farnsworth second-graders are learning computer graphics by "assembling" a space, and students in fifth grade learn of the connection between catapults and rockets, and also begin ground school and "flight training" under the supervision of a professional pilot before being allowed to use the flight simulators.

"Intelligence is not determined by ZIP code," he said. "We're a poor school. We just don't act like it."said Vincent.
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