Qt opens source code repositories

Since attending the company’s ‘developer days’ event in Munich in late Autumn of last year, I’ve been keeping an inquisitive eye open for news emanating from Nokia, Qt Software.

Since attending the company’s ‘developer days’ event in Munich in late Autumn of last year, I’ve been keeping an inquisitive eye open for news emanating from Nokia, Qt Software. Also, with Sun’s JavaOne conference right up ahead on my to do list, I am keeping my open source radar particularly finely tuned right now – as such, it is encouraging to see Qt Software making good on its plans to release the Qt source code repositories to the developer community, which it did so earlier this week.

This news of course opens the door to software engineers who feel that they want to help guide and shape the future development of Qt. Not that this isn’t good news in its own right, but I think one of the more interesting aspects of what happens with a source code repository when it opens up like this is how it is subsequently managed and looked after.

With code contributions, translations, examples and other contributions to juggle (or corral and control if you prefer), Qt Software says that it has also launched a web-based source code management system based on the principles of the Git and Gitorious open source version control and collaboration structure.

In addition to Qt-based version control data, the company’s web site details the fact that this contribution portal will also host a number of Qt-related tools and projects, including the Qt Creator IDE, Qt Jambi and various Qt Labs projects.

On the face of it, the relationship here appears to be a suitably symbiotic one (in the open source sense), as Qt Software says it is also working with the founders of the Gitorious project to develop and improve the Gitorious infrastructure - including adding team support and wikis.

Also in the mix this week is some roadmap news. In the same week that I started off talking about Symbian’s roadmap projections, Qt Software is also laying down it’s plans for all to see here if you wish to view it. All part of the open source push I suppose – and why not after all?

I guess this is an interesting set of developments in some respects. Qt Software (formerly Trolltech of course) has appeared to be quietly getting its house in order since the Nokia acquisition. Announcements since that time have been subtly delivered, if not almost reserved in comparison to the “check out our ground breaking uniquely powerful toolset and platform” sort of showboating we hear elsewhere.

Proof then that the company has thought long and hard about its open source strategy? It’s not for me to say. But with its Nokia parent now overseeing corporate development, one can only imagine that they’re spelling strategy with a capital S right now.