​Samsung launches 2-in-1 laptop in South Korea, China

Samsung has launched its Samsung Notebook 9 Spin, its super-premium two-in-one laptop monster, in South Korea and China following its US launch last year.

Samsung has launched the Samsung Notebook 9 Spin, a two-in-one notebook/tablet hybrid with a touch screen that spins 360 degrees, in South Korea and China.

Users can alternate between using the 940X3L laptop in four modes -- notebook, stand, kiosk, and tablet -- using the four sensors that automatically alternate where the touch screen is facing, the South Korean tech giant said.

Notebook mode is for conventional usage, such as writing an office document. The keyboard can be turned 180-degrees backward for kiosk mode when watching videos or playing games.

Samsung divided the hinge that connects the touch screen and the keyboard in the two parts to allow it to rotate 360 degrees. Stand mode is for video chatting, with the display able to turn 360 degrees for on-the-go usage, the firm said.

When using it outdoors, the screen automatically increases its luminous to 700nit from 350nit to maintain resolution quality.

Samsung Notebook 9 Spin has a full-metal body and weighs 1.3 kilograms. It is 14.9 millimeters, or 0.59 inches, thick.

It comes with the company's quick charge also applied to its premium smartphones that allows full charging within 90 minutes and 10 hours continuous usage time.

It has a 13.3-inches QHD+ Display(3,200 x 1,800) and has real-time high dynamic range (HDR) that controls pixel brightness and contrast ratio. HDR was introduced in its TVs for the first time last year.

It has a price-tag of 2.09 million won ($1,830), a super-premium price range. Sales of the model will begin in South Korea and China on Tuesday, having already started in the US in November.

The South Korean tech behemoth unveiled new models in the Notebook 9 series at CES earlier this year. It has pulled out its PC business in most countries but continues to sell them in South Korea and North America.

Overall PC sales have continued to decline, and fell below 65 million units for the first time since 2007 in the first quarter this year.