/>
X

Photos: The tech secrets behind Wimbledon

Following the tennis action from the court to the web and PDAs <br /><br />
40148995-1-wimbledon-and-bt-shop-021-custom.jpg
1 of 5 Steve Ranger/ZDNET

Following the tennis action from the court to the web and PDAs

This keypad might not look like much but the data it conveys is central to many of the systems running at Wimbledon this year. It is used by a team of county-standard tennis players who watch the matches taking place and record information on serves, aces and shots played.

Photo credit: Steve Ranger

40148995-2-wimbledon-and-bt-shop-025-custom.jpg
2 of 5 Steve Ranger/ZDNET

IBM provides the technology infrastructure for the championships. The data from the keypads is sent back to the IBM control centre at Wimbledon, where racks of ThinkPads - two for each show court - take that data and turn it into useful statistics which can be used by commentators and other systems. After matches, players on Centre and Number 1 courts are also provided with a detailed analysis of their performance using this data.

Photo credit: Steve Ranger

40148995-3-wimbledon-and-bt-shop-030-custom.jpg
3 of 5 Steve Ranger/ZDNET

Around 180 people work on the Wimbledon IT project across the year, with the hardware delivered in two removal lorries four weeks before the championships begin and then packed up again afterwards. The people pictured here are a back-up team recording match data. Umpires also record match data on PDAs mounted on their chairs, providing an alternative source of information.

Photo credit: Steve Ranger

40148995-4-wimbledon-and-bt-shop-044-custom.jpg
4 of 5 Steve Ranger/ZDNET

Action in top games is also streamed live on handhelds to VIP guests. The same devices are used by security guards who need to know when a game is ending so they can come and collect the players.

Photo credit: Steve Ranger

40148995-5-wimbledon-and-bt-shop-066-custom.jpg
5 of 5 Steve Ranger/ZDNET

The data is also used to power the website Wimbledon.org. It gets around 20 million hits per day and IBM says it is now 35 per cent cheaper to run than it was in 2001 - while dealing with twice the traffic. Wimbledon visitors can also access the data in kiosks like this around the site.

Photo credit: Steve Ranger

Related Galleries

Holiday wallpaper for your phone: Christmas, Hanukkah, New Year's, and winter scenes
Holiday lights in Central Park background

Related Galleries

Holiday wallpaper for your phone: Christmas, Hanukkah, New Year's, and winter scenes

21 Photos
Winter backgrounds for your next virtual meeting
Wooden lodge in pine forest with heavy snow reflection on Lake O'hara at Yoho national park

Related Galleries

Winter backgrounds for your next virtual meeting

21 Photos
Holiday backgrounds for Zoom: Christmas cheer, New Year's Eve, Hanukkah and winter scenes
3D Rendering Christmas interior

Related Galleries

Holiday backgrounds for Zoom: Christmas cheer, New Year's Eve, Hanukkah and winter scenes

21 Photos
Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6: Electric vehicle extravaganza
img-8825

Related Galleries

Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6: Electric vehicle extravaganza

26 Photos
A weekend with Google's Chrome OS Flex
img-9792-2

Related Galleries

A weekend with Google's Chrome OS Flex

22 Photos
Cybersecurity flaws, customer experiences, smartphone losses, and more: ZDNet's research roundup
shutterstock-1024665187.jpg

Related Galleries

Cybersecurity flaws, customer experiences, smartphone losses, and more: ZDNet's research roundup

8 Photos
Inside a fake $20 '16TB external M.2 SSD'
Full of promises!

Related Galleries

Inside a fake $20 '16TB external M.2 SSD'

8 Photos