Microsoft to require COVID-19 vaccination proof for U.S. employees, vendors

Microsoft has pushed back the earliest full reopening date for its U.S. worksites to October 4 from September 7. And it is planning to require proof of vaccination as of September for its U.S. employees, vendors and guests.

Microsoft plans to require proof of COVID-19 vaccination for all employees, vendors and guests entering Microsoft buildings in the U.S. as of September 2021. Officials shared the new guidance on August 3.

Microsoft officials also said today that the company has pushed back the earliest date for the full opening of its U.S. worksites to October 4. After pushing its target date for returning to work several times, Microsoft's earliest target for full reopening was September 7. A number of U.S. Microsoft employees already have been going back into the Redmond, Wash., area offices, at least part time.

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Officials said today that Microsoft will have an "accommodation" process in place for employees, so that those with a medical condition or other protected reason, such as religion, which prevents them from getting vaccinated, will be able to obtain an exemption. They also said caregivers of those who are immunosuppressed or parents of children too young to receive a vaccine will be able to continue to work from home until January 2022.

Last week, officials with Microsoft's LinkedIn subsidiary said LinkedIn employees will be able to continue to work remotely indefinitely.

Microsoft officials said they will be reviewing the need for remote workon a local basis in each region, country and state where the company does business and will adjust dates and policies as needed.

A growing number of tech and non-tech businesses are mandating vaccination for their employees. Some, instead, are planning to require employees to wear masks indoors as a way to try to stave off the resurgence of the COVID pandemic's newest variants.