​Midas IT launches AI recruitment solution

The Korean firm's inAIR solution automates the recruitment process and uses AI to conduct online interviews.

20180307144130.jpg

Midas IT's inAIR solution conducts automated online interviews for recruitment using AI.

(Image: Cho Mu-Hyun)

South Korean company Midas IT has launched an enterprise solution that allows clients to use artificial intelligence (AI) to conduct recruitment interviews.

inAIR automates the application process and uses an AI bot dubbed MIGHTY to conduct applicant interviews.

MIGHTY asks questions and conducts games for the interviewee who can start the interview at any computer with a camera and microphone.

The AI reads the interviewee's vitals through facial recognition and can determine whether he or she is being truthful by analysing voice tone and verbal patterns.

It also reads the emotion and expression of the interviewee by analysing 68 muscles in the face.

Game results will also allow it to suggest the best department the recruit is suited for. It also collects and analyses the words used by the interviewee and can throw in surprise questions.

The games, based on studies in neurology, are designed to map the interviewee's prefrontal cortex to find out his or her temperament and aptitude. MIGHTY has meta-analysed 450 academic papers on neurology.

Midas IT also collected data from employees of other companies -- those of high performers and low -- to set standards for quantifying competence needed for jobs. It collected data of 3,082 employees from 28 firms.

The interview is recorded and the client is offered a report that shows the applicant's score, most-used key words, ranking among total interviewees, and suggestions for positions.

Midas IT said it used the solution for its own recruitment for the second half of last year. The solution took 10,200 applicants, interviewed 10,000, and finally selected 30.

The firm said it showed accuracy of 82 percent to find high-performing talent. Conventional structured interviews had a validity between 30 to 40 percent while unstructured interviews had 10 percent, and inAIR's was far superior, Midas IT said.

The solution is provided by the cloud and sales will begin this week. It is part of the firm's Midas HRi solutions, which also include inHR, a performance measuring module for employees.

Korean firms are gearing up for AI. Samsung will show off three in-house startups focused on AI in the upcoming SXSW tradeshow in Texas.

Chat giant Kakao is providing an open tool for developers to use its AI platform.

PREVIOUS AND RELATED COVERAGE

Samsung to show off in-house AI startups at SXSW

Samsung Electronics will show off three new projects from its in-house startup program C-Lab that are focused on artificial intelligence at the upcoming SXSW 2018.

Korean chat giant Kakao to form blockchain subsidiary

South Korean chat giant Kakao will form a subsidiary that services blockchain, the company announced, with speculation of an imminent ICO to secure funds.

Gaming AI beats human top scores by cheating

The artificial intelligence system had no qualms about exploiting ancient bugs to win.

A floating AI assistant will join astronauts on the International Space Station

Siri cracked under pressure and Google doesn't have the right stuff, but CIMON should be mission ready by June.

Toyota to form $2.8 billion autonomous vehicle research venture

The new joint venture will focus on self-driving technology development.

Will Bixby consolidate Samsung's smart TV and IoT experience?

Samsung is bringing AI to its smart TVs in the form of voice assistant Bixby, but whether the move will bring the company closer to its 'total' IoT consumer experience remains to be seen.

IBM Watson CTO: The 3 ethical principles AI needs to embrace (TechRepublic)

TechRepublic spoke to IBM's Rob High about the ethical, privacy, and security obstacles that artificial intelligence has to overcome.