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Samsung printers join Amazon's Dash Replenishment Service

There's now a handful of Samsung printers that will monitor toner levels over time, and place a resupply order on Amazon before running out.

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Amazon has added Samsung printers to its Dash Replenishment Service (DRS) -- the tech giant's device integration program that enables connected household gadgets to monitor and automatically reorder consumables when the supply runs low.

There's now a handful of Samsung printers that will monitor toner levels over time, and place a resupply order on Amazon before running out.

Supported printers include Samsung's SL-C430W, SL-C480FW, SL-M2835DW, and SL-M2885FW models.

The news comes a month after Amazon announced that first batch of DRS-powered devices -- a smart washing machine from General Electric, select Brother printers and glucose-monitors from Gmate Smart -- went live. The addition of Samsung means there are now two printer brands on the DRS.

Amazon has been building out the DRS for the last year. The e-commerce giant first introduced the Dash Button last April as a one-click buying system where consumers place tiny, logo-laden plastic sticks around their home, connect them to WiFi, and simply push a button when they run low on a particular item.

Behind the launch of the Dash Buttons was the DRS. For the service to work, device makers either build a physical one-click button into their hardware to reorder products, or integrate Amazon's DRS APIs into the device's software, which allows them to connect to Amazon's infrastructure to fulfill supply orders, as needed.

The program took on a more serious Internet of Things tone last October, when Amazon significantly widened the ecosystem of hardware partners participating in DRS. At the time, Samsung, General Electric, Oster and a host of others signed up to build devices and appliances with the ability to reorder products without any help at all.

Anyone that's ever owned a printer is well aware of the never-ending ink struggle, which makes this particular application of the DRS all the more useful. Sure, automatic refills of laundry detergent and pet food are great, but there are few things as maddening as running out of toner at the exact moment you need to print that super important document.