Special Feature
Part of a ZDNet Special Feature: Can technology save the NHS?

​The NHS and technology: How innovation is changing healthcare (free PDF)

This special report from ZDNet and TechRepublic looks at how technologies from AI and virtual reality to wearables and robots could help the NHS. Download it as a free PDF ebook.

Special Feature

The NHS and technology: How innovation is revolutionizing healthcare (free PDF)

AI and robots, IoT, virtual and augmented reality, and wearables—all are innovative technologies that could boost healthcare and productivity across the NHS. This ebook looks at how these technologies are being implemented and their current and future impact on health services.

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It is one of the largest organisations in the world, but the National Health Service (NHS) has rarely been at the forefront of new technologies. Often this is for good reasons; spending money on expensive and untested technologies is hard to justify when budgets are tight, and the NHS has also seen big technology projects go badly wrong in the recent past.

However, just as a trend for digital transformation is sweeping through many organisations, so there's a growing realisation that there are technologies that could make a significant difference to how the NHS is managed, and to how healthcare is delivered to patients.

New technologies could free staff from unnecessary tasks and free up time and money, which could then be used to improve front-line care.

Artificial intelligence and robots, IoT, virtual and augmented reality and wearables -- all are innovative technologies that could potentially boost healthcare and productivity across the NHS. The opportunities, and risks, of these technologies are covered in the articles in this special report, which are contained in this free ebook.

This ebook looks at how these technologies are being implemented and their current and future impact on health services. To read the articles in the special report, download this free PDF: The NHS and technology: How innovation is revolutionising healthcare.

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