Adrian Kingsley-Hughes

Adrian Kingsley-Hughes is an internationally published technology author who has devoted over two decades to helping users get the most from technology -- whether that be by learning to program, building a PC from a pile of parts, or helping them get the most from their new MP3 player or digital camera. Adrian has authored/co-authored technical books on a variety of topics, ranging from programming to building and maintaining PCs. His most recent books include 'Build the Ultimate Custom PC', 'Beginning Programming' and 'The PC Doctor's Fix It Yourself Guide'. He has also written training manuals that have been used by a number of Fortune 500 companies.

Latest Posts

The printer cartridge scam

The printer cartridge scam

Inkjet printers have been around for a while now, but the popularity of digital cameras has made them almost a requirement for a modern home PC set up. However, there's a growing feeling among inkjet printer owners that while printers themselves are cheap, the prices of inkjet cartridges are kept artificially elevated. Is there any truth to this belief? After taking a look at the numbers, I think that there is. But the problem goes way beyond genuine cartridges.

July 5, 2006 by in Printers

How much storage is enough storage?

How much storage is enough storage?

You can never have enough RAM, your CPU can never be too fast, and your hard drives can't be too big. Of the three though, it's my demand for hard drive space that's been pushed the hardest over the last couple of years. It's great to have bags of RAM and a fast CPU, but that doesn't mean anything if you don't have the free drive space to install and save data to.

June 23, 2006 by in Windows

Fair use, Xbox hacking, and how far will Linux users go to get a cheap PC?

Fair use, Xbox hacking, and how far will Linux users go to get a cheap PC?

You hear a lot about "rights" when discussing any topic associated with copyright or fair use. Each side sees a whole series of rights that they need to defend from being eroded by the rights of the other side. The thing with fair use is that there's a huge gray area between legitimate fair use (say, copying a CD for use in a car) and taking advantage (say, making 10 copies of a CD and selling them to friends at a buck a time). But how does fair use apply to hacking hardware? Is this an innocent past time or an activity that can cost us all more in the way of time and increased DRM restrictions.

June 22, 2006 by in Enterprise Software

Technology makes it too easy to break copyright laws

Technology makes it too easy to break copyright laws

I'm a firm believer that copyright laws are an essential tool in making sure that the creator of any piece of work (whether that work be analog or digital) gets a fair opportunity to make a living from their efforts. I also strongly believe that anyone who thinks that copyright laws are a bad thing has never actually created something and based their livelihood on that piece of work generating an income. However, I am also a firm believer in fair use and the fair application of the law, and the way that I see current copyright laws being used to criminalize minor copyright infringements bothers me a great deal.

June 20, 2006 by in Legal

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