Adrian Kingsley-Hughes

Adrian Kingsley-Hughes is an internationally published technology author who has devoted over two decades to helping users get the most from technology -- whether that be by learning to program, building a PC from a pile of parts, or helping them get the most from their new MP3 player or digital camera. Adrian has authored/co-authored technical books on a variety of topics, ranging from programming to building and maintaining PCs. His most recent books include 'Build the Ultimate Custom PC', 'Beginning Programming' and 'The PC Doctor's Fix It Yourself Guide'. He has also written training manuals that have been used by a number of Fortune 500 companies.

Latest Posts

MacBook Air - Will all the cool evaporate when someone asks you to read/rip/burn a disc?

MacBook Air - Will all the cool evaporate when someone asks you to read/rip/burn a disc?

Over the weekend I was discussing the pros and cons of the MacBook Air with a bunch of other tech geeks and we came to the conclusion that the lack of an optical drive is a brave move of Apple's part (a move that other notebook manufacturers are likely to copy over the coming months), but that this could be the feature that's either the deal-maker or deal-breaker.

January 20, 2008 by in Apple

Apple and the war against the user-replaceable battery

Apple and the war against the user-replaceable battery

Apple has to be the most high-profile hardware manufacturer on the planet. Whatever it is that comes out of Cupertino is instantly put under intense scrutiny, and as a rule pundits are divided - some love Apple products, while others hate them. Me, I feel divided. Some Apple products fit in with my lifestyle perfectly, while others just don't light my fire. But one design aspect of Apple's latest product offerings bothers me greatly - and that's the gradual eradication of the user-replaceable battery.

January 20, 2008 by in Apple

Apple, the $20 iPod touch update and GAAP

Apple, the $20 iPod touch update and GAAP

Since my post yesterday about the $20 iPod touch software update several readers have contacted me to explain how Apple had to charge for this update because of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). This issue, so I'm told, is much the same as the way Apple had to charge $1.99 the 802.11n enabler for the Intel-based MacBooks and MacBook Pros. Personally, I don't buy this. If this is going to be Apple's defense over the charge, then I say it's nothing more than a smokescreen. Here's why ...

January 15, 2008 by in iPhone

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