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100 billion planets - we are surely not alone (photos)

A new study says current research indicates that, on average, there is at least one planet per star in the Milky Way.
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Topic: Innovation
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1 of 10 Andy Smith/ZDNet

A new study says our Milky Way galaxy contains more than 100 billion planets - theorizing that recent discoveries have indicated that there is, on average, at least one planet per star. The study also says that a minimum of 1,500 planets within just 50 light-years of Earth. Read the full story on SmartPlanet.

Source: NASA

 

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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2 of 10 Andy Smith/ZDNet

Scientists from NASA's Kepler project have discovered a sun called KOI-961 with a solar system that contains three rocky planets that are smaller than Earth. The planets are too hot and close to the star to be habitable for humans but finding three exoplanets so small gives hope for the existance of a planet similar to Earth where life could exist. A year on these planets, one orbit around their sun, lasts about 2 days.

Currently Kepler scientists are monitoring 150,000 stars for changes in their light which indicates a planet is passing in front of it.

Read the full story on SmartPlanet.

Source: NASA

 

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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3 of 10 Andy Smith/ZDNet

Astronomers have found at least 10 planets to be homeless - floating freely without a parent star. It's theorized that these Jupiter-sized planets were booted from emerging star systems.

Read the full story on SmartPlanet.

Source: NASA

 

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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4 of 10 Andy Smith/ZDNet

NASA announced the incredible results for its Kepler program in 2011. It started out with the discovery of the first rocky planet, then moved on to other discoveries such as a six-planet solar system and a planet orbiting one star of a binary star system. Kepler claims over 1,000 planet discoveries and 170 multiple planet solar systems.

Read the full story on SmartPlanet.

Source: NASA

 

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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5 of 10 Andy Smith/ZDNet

NASA's Kepler mission announced that it has discovered the first two Earth-sized planets that are orbiting a star similar to our sun.

Read the full story on SmartPlanet.

Source: NASA

 

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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6 of 10 Andy Smith/ZDNet

NASA's Kepler project last month discovered the first planet from another star that could possibly hold liquid water on its surface. So far, the Kepler Program has found more than 1,000 planets.

Read the full story on SmartPlanet.

Source: NASA

 

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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7 of 10 Andy Smith/ZDNet

Using European Space Agency's Herschel Space Observatory, astronomers have discovered a disc of water vapor orbiting around a planet outside our solar system. The scientists say that there's more than enough cold water vapor to fill the oceans on Earth and suggested this could be how they formed. They also theorize that comets that are formed within the disc could be responsible for transporting water to other parts of the solar system.

Read the full story on SmartPlanet.

Credit: NASA

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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8 of 10 Andy Smith/ZDNet

Scientists using the 10-meter Keck telescopes in Kamuela, HI have captured evidence of a planet forming around a star. Scientists say that LkCa 15 b is the youngest planet ever found.

Read the full story on SmartPlanet.

Credit: NASA (artist's concept)

 

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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9 of 10 Andy Smith/ZDNet

An international team of scientists using the CoRoT (Convection, Rotation and Transits) space telescope, operated by the French space agency CNES, last year discovered 10 new planets including one that's just 10s of million years young (for planets), a Saturn-like planet, and two others that resemble Neptune.

Read the full story on SmartPlanet.

Credit: NASA

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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10 of 10 Andy Smith/ZDNet

Students from MIT participated in a three-semester program where they built a small satellite called "CubeSat" which is designed to explore and study exoplanets. Because CubeSats are so small, said to be about as long as a skateboard, they can easily fit hitch a ride rockets carrying larger payloads. The first CubeSat should be ready for launch in 2012.

Source: JPL

 

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

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