/>
X

A visual history of Internet Explorer from 1 to 9

Check out the many interfaces of Internet Explorer versions 1 to 9
zd-defaultauthor-greg-shultz.jpg
By Greg Shultz on
461766.jpg
1 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet
It's a safe bet that most Windows users have used multiple versions of Internet Explorer. After all, it has been around for years now!
As each new version comes along, we move right into the new user interface and new features and promptly forget what it was like to use the previous version. As such, with IE9 looming, it is quite a trip down memory lane to take a look back at the earlier versions.
In this gallery, you'll be able to browse through the main user interface and several common dialog boxes from Internet Explorer 1 to Windows Internet Explorer 9.
By the way, you can now test drive IE9.
63759.png
2 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet
In August 1995, Microsoft releases the Windows 95 Plus! Pack, which includes Internet Explorer 1.
It is interesting to note that Microsoft picked up the version numbering scheme where NCSA Mosaic left off rather than actually christening this version 1.
63760.png
3 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The original Internet Explorer desktop icon is titled "The Internet."

63761.png
4 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The toolbar in Internet Explorer 1 was very sparse by today's standards. The animated Windows flag appeared to flutter in the wind while the page was loading.

63762.png
5 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The Favorites menu as well as the Add to Favorites dialog box are quite simple.

63763.png
6 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The main features in the 4-tabbed Options dialog box are the History and Cache sections on the Advanced tab.

63764.png
7 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet
In November 1995, Microsoft releases Internet Explorer 2 for both Windows and Mac. This version supports JavaScript, frames, Secure Socket Layer (SSL), cookies and newsgroups (NNTP).
Note that this is actually listed as version 2, but the NCSA Mosaic numbering scheme is now in parentesis.
63765.png
8 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

Microsoft added a few of more buttons to the toolbar in version 2.

63766.png
9 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The Options dialog box gains a couple more tabs.

63767.png
10 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

In August 1996, Microsoft releases Windows 95 OSR2, which includes Internet Explorer 3. This version supports CSS, the ability to display gifs and jpg files, play MIDI sound files, and introduces the animated Blue e logo.

63768.png
11 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The toolbar in Internet Explorer 3 is more refined and sports a customizable background. The animated Blue e logo adds a nice touch to the new toolbar.

63769.png
12 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

While the Favorites menu remains the same, the Add to Favorites dialog box is redesigned in order to make organizing your links that much easier.

63770.png
13 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

To further encourage orderliness, Internet Explorer 3 now features the Organize Favorites dialog box.

63771.png
14 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The Options dialog box is reworked a bit as new features are incorporated into the browser.

63772.png
15 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

While Microsoft releases Internet Explorer 4 in September of 1997, it doesn't really enter the mainstream until June of 1998 when Microsoft releases Windows 98, which includes Internet Explorer 4, Active Desktop and support for DHTML.

63773.png
16 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The blue e logo makes its way over to the desktop as the new Internet Explorer icon. The short-lived Channel Bar also makes it's home on the desktop.

63774.png
17 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

Dividers now appear on the toolbar to help separate the various buttons. The animated flag and globe combination replace the Blue e logo.

63775.png
18 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The Favoroties menu get a more prominent location while the Add Favorites dialog box gets some new options.

63776.png
19 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The dialog box is renamed Internet Options and more streamlined controls make it easier to clean up after yourself.

63777.png
20 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

In May 1999, Microsoft releases Windows 98 Second Edition, which includes Internet Explorer 5. This version supports XML, XSL, and improved CSS functionality.

63778.png
21 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The big change in Internet Explorer 5'smain window is the addtion of the Go button in the Address bar.

63779.png
22 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The Organize Favorites dialog box is redesigned to make it even easier or you to classify your favorites.

63780.png
23 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

In September of 2000, Microsoft releases Windows Millennium Edition, which includes Internet Explorer 5.5. While most of the improvements in this version are behind the scenes, it is the first version to ship with 128 bit encryption.

63781.png
24 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The desktop icon gets a new shine.

63782.png
25 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

Messenger moves into the toolbar in Internet Explorer 5.5.

63783.png
26 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

In October 2001, Microsoft releases Windows XP, which includes Internet Explorer 6. This version introduces auto image resizing and print preview. In Windows XP SP2, Internet Explorer 6 gets a pop-up blocker.

63784.png
27 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

In order to match Windows XP's new Luna desktop scheme, the Internet Explorer desktop icon gets a new lighter blue coloring.

63785.png
28 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The buttons on Internet Explorer 6's toolbar finally get some color. The new colorful animated flag looks much cleaner on a white background.

63786.png
29 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The Favorites menu still appears on the left side of the screen and the Add Favorites remains basically the same.

63787.png
30 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The Organize Favorites dialog box remains the same, but looks better in Luna.

63788.png
31 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The Internet Options dialog box receives a Privacy tab and the ability to remove Cookies is added to the General tab.

63789.png
32 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

In late 2006, Microsoft releases a rebranded Windows Internet Explorer 7, which is then included in Windows Vista in January 2007. In addition to the new name, this version supports tabbed browsing, RSS, Page Zoom, Quick Tabs, an Anti-Phishing filter as well as a number of other security protection features.

63790.png
33 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

In order to match Windows Vista's new Aero desktop scheme, the Internet Explorer desktop icon gets a new glass look.

63791.png
34 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

A more refined arrangment of the toolbar and the tabbed interface makes using internet Explorer 7 a dream.

63792.png
35 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The Favorites menu behaves more like the drop down menu of old, yet adds new features like Feeds and incorporates old features like History. You can add individual favorites as well as tab goups.

63793.png
36 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

A bigger Organize Favorites dialog box with a larger portion of the interface devoted to actual favorites just seems to make for better organization.

63794.png
37 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The Internet Options dialog box using sub-dialog boxes to hold more controls and to better organize its features.

456695.png
38 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

Internet Explorer 8, released on March 19, 2009, brought improvements with tabbed browsing, visual search, accelerators, a smarter address bar, and use of developer tools. See Ed Bott's initial review.

456696.png
39 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

One new feature touted in Internet Explorer 8 is the capability to enable site suggestions.

456698.png
40 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

Web Slice is another new feature that's related to your Favorites. Web Slice serves as a sort of visual RSS for your favorite sites. When a page can be turned into a Web Slice, you'll see an icon you can click to add it to your gallery. When your favored page updates, the Web Slice will become highlighted.

456694.png
41 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet
IE8 introduced the Accelerator feature which is a separate context menu that appears when you highlight a word or phrase. Internet Explorer's "accelerators" speed up your follow-through by offering shortcuts to blog, e-mail, map, search, define the word, and so on--without starting a new action in another screen.

Credit: Jessica Dolcourt CNET

456697.png
42 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet
Internet Explorer's visual search field previews information without opening a new Web page. After entering a search term, you can click a partnered search-engine icon below the text field to get a preview of the results. From here, you'll be able to quickly navigate to the Web site, or in this case, click elsewhere on the screen and continue what you're doing.

Credit: Jessica Dolcourt CNET

456700.jpg
43 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

If you begin from a search results page, you might open several new tabs from links on that page. When you do, the parent tab and each new tab pick up a distinctive color.

456701.jpg
44 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

Customizing the list of search providers adds some features you won’t find elsewhere, including visual results from sites like Ebay and Amazon.com, which appear in a drop-down list as you type.

456702.jpg
45 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

With the developer toolbar, you can clear the browser cache, disable images for the current page, and delete cookies (including session cookies) from the current domain by hitting F12.

456703.png
46 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

The IE9 platform preview.

456705.png
47 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

A demo.

456706.png
48 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet
456707.png
49 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet
456708.png
50 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet
456709.png
51 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet
63795.png
52 of 52 Greg Shultz/ZDNet

Related Galleries

Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6: Electric vehicle extravaganza
img-8825

Related Galleries

Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6: Electric vehicle extravaganza

26 Photos
A weekend with Google's Chrome OS Flex
img-9792-2

Related Galleries

A weekend with Google's Chrome OS Flex

22 Photos
Cybersecurity flaws, customer experiences, smartphone losses, and more: ZDNet's research roundup
shutterstock-1024665187.jpg

Related Galleries

Cybersecurity flaws, customer experiences, smartphone losses, and more: ZDNet's research roundup

8 Photos
Inside a fake $20 '16TB external M.2 SSD'
Full of promises!

Related Galleries

Inside a fake $20 '16TB external M.2 SSD'

8 Photos
Hybrid working, touchscreen MacBook hopes, cybersecurity concerns, and more: ZDNet's tech research roundup
Asian woman working at a desk in front of a computer and calculator

Related Galleries

Hybrid working, touchscreen MacBook hopes, cybersecurity concerns, and more: ZDNet's tech research roundup

8 Photos
Developer trends, zero-day risks, 5G speeds, and more: Tech research roundup
Person seated at a booth in a cafe looks at their phone and laptop.

Related Galleries

Developer trends, zero-day risks, 5G speeds, and more: Tech research roundup

10 Photos
Drive Electric Day: A dizzying array of EVs in sunny Florida
ca3b4019-26c5-4ce0-a844-5aac39e2c34b.jpg

Related Galleries

Drive Electric Day: A dizzying array of EVs in sunny Florida

16 Photos